Dancing Times

Archived since January 2015 Modern Archive

57 issues

Dancing Times, first published in 1894 as the house magazine of the Cavendish Rooms, London, a ballroom dancing establishment, is the oldest monthly devoted to dancing. It was bought in 1910 by P J S Richardson and T M Middleton and transformed into a national periodical, covering all forms of dancing, and reporting worldwide.

Largely through the initiative of Richardson, and his contacts throughout the dance teaching and performing profession, it played an instrumental part in the founding of the Royal Academy of Dance, the Camargo Society for the encouragement and presentation of British ballet (1930–33), and the British Board of Ballroom Dancing (now the British Dance Council), which codified the technique and controls the standards of the “English Style” of ballroom dancing.

Richardson continued as editor until 1958 when he was succeeded by A H Franks, journalist and author of books on ballet and social dancing, but remained president until his death in 1963. Franks split off the ballroom section of the magazine into a second periodical, Ballroom Dancing Times, and in 1962 doubled the format of Dancing Times to its present size of A4. Franks died suddenly in 1963 and Mary Clarke, then assistant editor, became editor. In 2015 the ballroom and social dance magazine, by then given the title Dance Today, was reintegrated into the pages of Dancing Times so that the magazine now covers all aspects of dance.

Dancing Times, edited by Jonathan Gray since Clarke’s retirement from the editorship in 2008, continues its original stated policy to maintain the highest standards of criticism and illustration, give voice to leading authorities, encourage high standards of teaching, encourage awareness of dance history and stress the importance of dance in education.

For more than 100 years Dancing Times has remained the leader in its field, sustained by loyal readers and advertisers alike.

Latest issue

As autumn approaches, this issue of Dancing Times takes a look at what has been happening in the dance world during the summer months. As well as Jack Anderson’s regular Notes from New York column, Iris Fanger and Barbara Newman went in search of further dance on New York’s Broadway and other venues – you can read about what they found there on page 18. In Dance Scene, David Mead travelled to Stuttgart to attend the biennial Colours Festival, and Kathy Elgin reports on the start of the Edinburgh International Festival with Scottish Ballet’s new two-act version of The Crucible. As well as those, in FRANCE/dance, Laura Cappelle saw what was on offer at the Avignon Festival.

In addition, we mark Northern Ballet’s 50th anniversary season, find out about the FEDORA awards, ask if ballroom and Latin American dancing are dying at grass-roots level in the UK, talk to street dancers Lil Buck and Jon Boogz, discover the wealth of dance material found in the UK’s museums, libraries and archives, and take a look at the National Ballet of Cuba.

Finally, I’m delighted to announce that – in addition to our regular online outlets – digital copies of Dancing Times are also now available to download from Exact Editions, an integrated content management platform for magazine and book publishers. To find out more on what they have to offer, why not visit exacteditions.com

Subjects: Dancing

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Dancing Times, first published in 1894 as the house magazine of the Cavendish Rooms, London, a ballroom dancing establishment, is the oldest monthly devoted to dancing. It was bought in 1910 by P J S Richardson and T M Middleton and transformed into a national periodical, covering all forms of dancing, and reporting worldwide.

Largely through the initiative of Richardson, and his contacts throughout the dance teaching and performing profession, it played an instrumental part in the founding of the Royal Academy of Dance, the Camargo Society for the encouragement and presentation of British ballet (1930–33), and the British Board of Ballroom Dancing (now the British Dance Council), which codified the technique and controls the standards of the “English Style” of ballroom dancing.

Richardson continued as editor until 1958 when he was succeeded by A H Franks, journalist and author of books on ballet and social dancing, but remained president until his death in 1963. Franks split off the ballroom section of the magazine into a second periodical, Ballroom Dancing Times, and in 1962 doubled the format of Dancing Times to its present size of A4. Franks died suddenly in 1963 and Mary Clarke, then assistant editor, became editor. In 2015 the ballroom and social dance magazine, by then given the title Dance Today, was reintegrated into the pages of Dancing Times so that the magazine now covers all aspects of dance.

Dancing Times, edited by Jonathan Gray since Clarke’s retirement from the editorship in 2008, continues its original stated policy to maintain the highest standards of criticism and illustration, give voice to leading authorities, encourage high standards of teaching, encourage awareness of dance history and stress the importance of dance in education.

For more than 100 years Dancing Times has remained the leader in its field, sustained by loyal readers and advertisers alike.

  • First Issue: January 2015
  • Latest Issue: September 2019
  • Issue Count: 57
  • Published: Monthly