The Critic

Archivado desde November 2019 / Issue 1 Archivo Completo

31 números

The Critic is Britain’s new monthly magazine for politics, ideas, art, literature and much more. Co-edited by Michael Mosbacher and Christopher Montgomery, The Critic exists to push back against a self-regarding and dangerous consensus that finds critical voices troubling, triggering, insensitive and disrespectful. The point is not provocation or trolling. The point of honest criticism is to better approach truth, not deny its possibility.

Ossified thought and a lack of intellectual rigour are depressing features of all sides of today’s political and cultural debate. Our writers will subscribe to no editorial line nor serve the interests of any party, faction or cause. We ask them to write because we expect them to be honest, and lucidly so. Look to our contributors and fault us if they are not. 

Contributors to the magazine include Jonathan Meades, Douglas Murray, Nick Cohen, Joshua Rozenberg, Anne McElvoy, Norman Lebrecht, Daniel Johnson, Lisa Hilton, Hannah Betts and Artists in Residence Adam Dant and Miriam Elia.

Último número

In the October issue of The Critic, the magazine for open-minded readers, Paul Lay takes his place in the queue of mourners for Queen Elizabeth II and reflects on monarchy and Midlands’ identity, the Rev Fergus Butler-Gailie defends modern expressions of grief and the historian, Andrew Roberts, reveals that the young Queen’s relationship with her first Prime Minister, Winston Churchill, was nothing like its portrayal in Netflix’s The Crown. Besides a new king, there is a new government: Patrick Porter decries Liz Truss’s neo-con foreign policy instincts, and Tom Hamilton assesses whether Keir Starmer finally has reasons to be cheerful. As the party conference season commences, veteran conference-goer, James Kirkup, lifts the lid on the horrors he has experienced and why he cheerfully comes back for more. Julie Bindel finds an absence of farmers but an abundance of “lifestyle” opportunists at her local farmers’ market; Lisa Hilton mixes it with Venice’s In and Out crowds, architecture critic Charles Saumarez-Smith ranks this year’s Stirling Prize contenders, Alexander Larman considers Philip Larkin in the centenary of the poet’s birth and Boris Starling salutes football’s resurrection man, Christian Eriksen.

Sujetos: News And Politics

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The Critic is Britain’s new monthly magazine for politics, ideas, art, literature and much more. Co-edited by Michael Mosbacher and Christopher Montgomery, The Critic exists to push back against a self-regarding and dangerous consensus that finds critical voices troubling, triggering, insensitive and disrespectful. The point is not provocation or trolling. The point of honest criticism is to better approach truth, not deny its possibility.

Ossified thought and a lack of intellectual rigour are depressing features of all sides of today’s political and cultural debate. Our writers will subscribe to no editorial line nor serve the interests of any party, faction or cause. We ask them to write because we expect them to be honest, and lucidly so. Look to our contributors and fault us if they are not. 

Contributors to the magazine include Jonathan Meades, Douglas Murray, Nick Cohen, Joshua Rozenberg, Anne McElvoy, Norman Lebrecht, Daniel Johnson, Lisa Hilton, Hannah Betts and Artists in Residence Adam Dant and Miriam Elia.

  • Primer Número: November 2019 / Issue 1
  • Último número: October 2022
  • Cantidad de números: 31
  • Publicado: Mensuel