The Spectator

Archived since 2 July 2005 Modern Archive

724 issues


The Spectator was established in 1828, and is the oldest continuously published magazine in the English language. The Spectator’s taste for controversy, however, remains undiminished. There is no party line to which The Spectator’s writers are bound - originality of thought and elegance of expression are the sole editorial constraints.

The trial issue contains a “Thought Crime Special” with articles from Melanie Phillips, “I think, therefore I’m guilty”; Christopher Booker writes about “Scientists in hiding; the demonisation of academics who question the consensus”; Alan Rusbridger explores “How to stifle the press” and how England’s libel laws make it easy.

UK politics come under scrutiny from James Forsyth, Brendan O’Neill ponders if teenagers could ever be “Drunk and orderly”; while Tom Hollander writes his diary and James Delingpole says eat local organic food if you like, but don’t kid yourself that it’s ‘green’.

The Spectator’s regular arts coverage includes books, theatre, opera, cinema and exhibitions.

Latest issue

1. Rod Liddle: a deal won’t save Boris Johnson
No deal isn’t only the best chance of getting a clean Brexit — it’s also the best way to make sure Jeremy Corbyn (‘Old Man Steptoe’) and his retinue of imbeciles don’t end up running the country, says Rod. ‘Only by championing no deal will our Prime Minister be able to nullify the threat of Nigel Farage and present the election as being a reformist, One Nation Tory party against a liberal elite which has betrayed the electorate.’

2. Jacob Rees-Mogg interviewed
‘I think it was a mistake to lie down in the Chamber,’ says the Leader of the Commons — commenting on his now infamous slouch — in an interview with Katy Balls and James Forsyth. He also reveals why he believes the ERG will back Boris’s Brexit deal, why he would like to see the Benn Act rebels return to the party (‘there’s no vindictiveness in successful political parties’), and how driving an old Bentley is helping to save the planet.

3. Helena Morrissey: my manifesto for the Bank of England
The woman tipped to succeed Mark Carney has now quit L&G and says in her Spectator diary what the next BoE governor should do: ‘resist the temptation to try to stimulate growth via negative interest rates’ and look on the bright side of Brexit by recognising ‘that the pound’s fall means world-class British goods and services are nearly 20 per cent cheaper than before the referendum’. And more.

4. Paul Wood: Trump’s Pax Russica
For 50 years, it has been the goal of American policy to keep Russia out of the Middle East, writes former BBC correspondent Paul Wood. But Trump’s withdrawal from Syria has one main beneficiary: Vladimir Putin. With Russia becoming closer to Turkey and Saudi Arabia, the Middle East faces a new order: Pax Russica.

5. Isabel Hardman: John McDonnell’s silent takeover of the Labour party
Over the past few weeks, rumours have swirled in Westminster that the Labour party has acquired a new leader: John McDonnell. Corbyn might still be in office, but it’s the Shadow Chancellor who wields the power. McDonnell is suspected to be behind the recent reorganisation (which has sidelined key Corbyn aides) and makes no secret of his frustrations at Corbyn’s Brexit stance. But what is his real agenda?

Subjects: Culture, News, Politics

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The Spectator was established in 1828, and is the oldest continuously published magazine in the English language. The Spectator’s taste for controversy, however, remains undiminished. There is no party line to which The Spectator’s writers are bound - originality of thought and elegance of expression are the sole editorial constraints.

The trial issue contains a “Thought Crime Special” with articles from Melanie Phillips, “I think, therefore I’m guilty”; Christopher Booker writes about “Scientists in hiding; the demonisation of academics who question the consensus”; Alan Rusbridger explores “How to stifle the press” and how England’s libel laws make it easy.

UK politics come under scrutiny from James Forsyth, Brendan O’Neill ponders if teenagers could ever be “Drunk and orderly”; while Tom Hollander writes his diary and James Delingpole says eat local organic food if you like, but don’t kid yourself that it’s ‘green’.

The Spectator’s regular arts coverage includes books, theatre, opera, cinema and exhibitions.

  • First Issue: 2 July 2005
  • Latest Issue: 19 October 2019
  • Issue Count: 724
  • Published: Weekly
  • ISSN: 2059-6499

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