The Spectator

Archived since 2 July 2005 Modern Archive

674 issues


The Spectator was established in 1828, and is the oldest continuously published magazine in the English language. The Spectator’s taste for controversy, however, remains undiminished. There is no party line to which The Spectator’s writers are bound - originality of thought and elegance of expression are the sole editorial constraints.

The trial issue contains a “Thought Crime Special” with articles from Melanie Phillips, “I think, therefore I’m guilty”; Christopher Booker writes about “Scientists in hiding; the demonisation of academics who question the consensus”; Alan Rusbridger explores “How to stifle the press” and how England’s libel laws make it easy.

UK politics come under scrutiny from James Forsyth, Brendan O’Neill ponders if teenagers could ever be “Drunk and orderly”; while Tom Hollander writes his diary and James Delingpole says eat local organic food if you like, but don’t kid yourself that it’s ‘green’.

The Spectator’s regular arts coverage includes books, theatre, opera, cinema and exhibitions.

Latest issue

Whether markets crash or not, investors will always be on the hunt for reliable income sources, so this month we have a special focus on income in the main mag.
We kick off with a look at some of the highest-yielding funds whose primary mission is to pay out over the odds: how do they ensure reliability of income, and what are the downsides of such a strategy?
That’s followed by Tom Bailey’s piece on the importance of good diversification of income sources, particularly in volatile times. He assesses the pros and cons of alternative income-focused asset classes, from property and infrastructure to debt and peer to peer lending. Structured products that pay out regularly are also spotlighted as another option for people who want some certainty in terms of both capital protection and income.
Meanwhile in a packed quarterly Trust supplement, the lead feature is a must-read for serious income investors. It lines up 10 trusts that have proved fantastic long-term investments over a decade of building up a nest-egg, followed by a decade of drawing an income – we’ve crunched the numbers to show that a portfolio of these 10 holdings would have quadrupled the money of a regular saver over the past 20 years, providing both capital growth and a meaty dividend flow.
Of course there’s plenty more coverage beyond income investment. The main magazine includes features ranging from Money Observer’s annual review of the 30 most consistently top-decile funds throughout the past three years, to David Prosser’s long view on the investment potential of the burgeoning battery industry, and a comparison of the relative merits of downsizing versus equity release schemes; in Trust, meanwhile, you can learn about the risks attached to buying investment trusts trading on a premium, and discover how managers are positioning themselves for Brexit.
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Subjects: Culture, News, Politics

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The Spectator was established in 1828, and is the oldest continuously published magazine in the English language. The Spectator’s taste for controversy, however, remains undiminished. There is no party line to which The Spectator’s writers are bound - originality of thought and elegance of expression are the sole editorial constraints.

The trial issue contains a “Thought Crime Special” with articles from Melanie Phillips, “I think, therefore I’m guilty”; Christopher Booker writes about “Scientists in hiding; the demonisation of academics who question the consensus”; Alan Rusbridger explores “How to stifle the press” and how England’s libel laws make it easy.

UK politics come under scrutiny from James Forsyth, Brendan O’Neill ponders if teenagers could ever be “Drunk and orderly”; while Tom Hollander writes his diary and James Delingpole says eat local organic food if you like, but don’t kid yourself that it’s ‘green’.

The Spectator’s regular arts coverage includes books, theatre, opera, cinema and exhibitions.

  • First Issue: 2 July 2005
  • Latest Issue: 20.10.2018
  • Issue Count: 674
  • Published: Weekly
  • ISSN: 2059-6499

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