Britain's Weirdest Railways

Mortons Railway Books  

An amazing journey along the most unusual railways ever built in Britain.

Heritage Railway editor Robin Jones has combed the British Isles to find the country’s weirdest railways, and presented the strangest of them in one volume.

For years, conspiracy theorists talked about a secret railway network beneath Wiltshire to serve a bunker city which would have been the seat of government in the event of a nuclear war - and were proved right! The pictures are all in this book.

Also, did you realise that there is a secret railway running through the fairytale island of St Michael’s Mount in Cornwall, or the remains of a complete network on Steep Holm in the Bristol Channel?

Brunel’s Great Western Railway broad gauge was years ahead of its time - and so was his atmospheric railway - but both were edged out by market forces and deficiencies of available technology.

Visit the Spurn Head Railway with its sail-powered vehicles. Look at the Volks Electric Railway in Brighton, the first electric line in Britain, and its truly bizarre sister line which had a passenger car running on stilts through the sea.

Subjects: Railways, Transport

Annuale €3,99

Includes web, iOS and Android access via Exact Editions apps.
Soddisfatti o rimborsati con un rimborso totale entro 30 giorni.
Si ricorda che si sta per procedere all’acquisto di un abbonamento online , non di una copia stampata ed inviata per posta.

An amazing journey along the most unusual railways ever built in Britain.

Heritage Railway editor Robin Jones has combed the British Isles to find the country’s weirdest railways, and presented the strangest of them in one volume.

For years, conspiracy theorists talked about a secret railway network beneath Wiltshire to serve a bunker city which would have been the seat of government in the event of a nuclear war - and were proved right! The pictures are all in this book.

Also, did you realise that there is a secret railway running through the fairytale island of St Michael’s Mount in Cornwall, or the remains of a complete network on Steep Holm in the Bristol Channel?

Brunel’s Great Western Railway broad gauge was years ahead of its time - and so was his atmospheric railway - but both were edged out by market forces and deficiencies of available technology.

Visit the Spurn Head Railway with its sail-powered vehicles. Look at the Volks Electric Railway in Brighton, the first electric line in Britain, and its truly bizarre sister line which had a passenger car running on stilts through the sea.

  • Publisher: Mortons
  • ISBN:

Titoli Relativi