Standpoint

Archiviato dal June 2008 Complete Archive

123 Edizioni


In a market swamped by the journalistic equivalent of fast food, Standpoint offers the discerning reader a feast of great writing. Its core mission is to celebrate our civilization, its arts and its values — in particular democracy, debate and freedom of speech — at a time when they are under threat.

Standpoint provides an opportunity for a fresh, truly international cast of writers to explore the timely and the timeless. It offers a guide for those perplexed by the 21st century and a running commentary for those who are happy to embrace it.

In a world of rapid change, Standpoint is an indispensable resource and companion.

In this trial issue, Nick Cohen shows how conservatives once cherished this country’s constitutional order. Now they are bulldozing it in the pursuit of a political principle. That may be tactically smart, but it is strategically stupid.

The ties that hold Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland together with England have rarely looked so fragile. As Simon Jenkins explains dogmatic centralism, not the mythical nationalism of the (patronisingly named) Celtic fringe, is to blame.

Helen Joyce explores the upheavals at Stonewall, a gay rights organisation that has adopted the new and divisive cause of unconditional trans equality. David Cox rallies the unWoke to his standard while Samir Shah (page 26) defends “white saviours”.

In our international coverage, Joseph Lian explains how the Chinese Communist Party has stoked the protest movement in Hong Kong by their obdurate refusal to deal with its initially modest demands. The Kremlin’s unflinching defence of its corrupt authoritarian rule has sparked dissent even in the loyal ranks of the Orthodox priesthood in Russia, as Victor Madeira shows.

Our new editor Edward Lucas explains how the post-1989 rediscovery of history turned sour .

And in our Civilisation section, Brian Griffiths reviews Charles Moore on Margaret Thatcher, Cindy Polemis looks at the method and madness of William Blake and Maureen Lipman explores the outer limits of casting convention.

Ultimo numero

INSPIRATION OR EDUCATION? Helen Dale on the perils of elite overproduction

WHY STOICISM STILL MATTERS by John Sellars

THE END OF CINEMA? by Matthew

David Collard on IAN HAMILTON AND THE POETRY WARS

EDUCATING HANDS AND HEARTS by David Goodhart

Jonathan Gaisman: MEISTERSINGER REHABILITATED

Stephen Bayley on WHY LUST TRUMPS LOVE

Stephen Booth looks at THE BREXIT CRUNCH

Fitzroy Morrissey finds A NEW REALITY FOR THE MIDDLE EAST

Calvin Robinson on WHEN BLACK LIVES MATTER MISSES THE POINT

BUYER’S REMORSE FOR FIRST-TIME TORIES by David Swift

Angela Ritch on HOME WORKING AND SOCIAL MOBILITY

AND Gillian Philip′s diary

Subjects: Culture, News, Politics

Includes web, iOS and Android access via Exact Editions apps.
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In a market swamped by the journalistic equivalent of fast food, Standpoint offers the discerning reader a feast of great writing. Its core mission is to celebrate our civilization, its arts and its values — in particular democracy, debate and freedom of speech — at a time when they are under threat.

Standpoint provides an opportunity for a fresh, truly international cast of writers to explore the timely and the timeless. It offers a guide for those perplexed by the 21st century and a running commentary for those who are happy to embrace it.

In a world of rapid change, Standpoint is an indispensable resource and companion.

In this trial issue, Nick Cohen shows how conservatives once cherished this country’s constitutional order. Now they are bulldozing it in the pursuit of a political principle. That may be tactically smart, but it is strategically stupid.

The ties that hold Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland together with England have rarely looked so fragile. As Simon Jenkins explains dogmatic centralism, not the mythical nationalism of the (patronisingly named) Celtic fringe, is to blame.

Helen Joyce explores the upheavals at Stonewall, a gay rights organisation that has adopted the new and divisive cause of unconditional trans equality. David Cox rallies the unWoke to his standard while Samir Shah (page 26) defends “white saviours”.

In our international coverage, Joseph Lian explains how the Chinese Communist Party has stoked the protest movement in Hong Kong by their obdurate refusal to deal with its initially modest demands. The Kremlin’s unflinching defence of its corrupt authoritarian rule has sparked dissent even in the loyal ranks of the Orthodox priesthood in Russia, as Victor Madeira shows.

Our new editor Edward Lucas explains how the post-1989 rediscovery of history turned sour .

And in our Civilisation section, Brian Griffiths reviews Charles Moore on Margaret Thatcher, Cindy Polemis looks at the method and madness of William Blake and Maureen Lipman explores the outer limits of casting convention.

  • Primo numero June 2008
  • Ultimo Numero: October/November 2020
  • Issue Count: 123
  • Pubblicato: Monthly
  • ISSN: 2059-6804

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