The Spectator

Archived since 2 July 2005 Modern Archive

677 issues


The Spectator was established in 1828, and is the oldest continuously published magazine in the English language. The Spectator’s taste for controversy, however, remains undiminished. There is no party line to which The Spectator’s writers are bound - originality of thought and elegance of expression are the sole editorial constraints.

The trial issue contains a “Thought Crime Special” with articles from Melanie Phillips, “I think, therefore I’m guilty”; Christopher Booker writes about “Scientists in hiding; the demonisation of academics who question the consensus”; Alan Rusbridger explores “How to stifle the press” and how England’s libel laws make it easy.

UK politics come under scrutiny from James Forsyth, Brendan O’Neill ponders if teenagers could ever be “Drunk and orderly”; while Tom Hollander writes his diary and James Delingpole says eat local organic food if you like, but don’t kid yourself that it’s ‘green’.

The Spectator’s regular arts coverage includes books, theatre, opera, cinema and exhibitions.

Latest issue

Brexit is served — and neither option is palatable. Theresa May hopes to have her cabinet approve a Brexit deal soon, but ministers are deeply worried about her plan for a UK-wide ‘backstop’. They fear this could keep the whole of the UK roped into EU regulation but without — unlike EU membership — a clear exit mechanism from it. One cabinet minister complains: ‘How bad does a deal have to be before she admits that it’s a bad deal?’ But the cabinet still doesn’t want no deal as they know how unprepared the country is for it. By accident or design, May’s abject failure to make proper preparations for no deal has become her strongest card in forcing through her deal.

Tim Laurence: how Macron broke a gentleman’s agreement on remembrance. In his diary, this week, he says: ‘This year 11 November falls on a Sunday, so the main remembrance events must all happen on one day. A gentleman’s agreement in Europe had been that each nation would mark it in their own way on their own soil. However President Macron has invited his fellow leaders to join him in Paris. Awkward. Does one snub one’s own country or the French? No doubt elegant solutions will be found.’

A tethered Trump? Ideal, says Lionel Shriver.

But don’t expect the President to be tethered too tightly, says Freddy Gray.

In defence of Roger Scruton. The digital mob is coming after him, as surely as they came after me, says Toby Young.

Simon Jenkins: don’t mention the war. We say ‘lest we forget’ but with more new war films and books out than ever there’s no risk of that. So why does the government spend £50 million of taxpayers’ money for yet more remembrance?

Britain’s new food fad. Laura Freeman on the dishes designed to be Instagrammed, not eaten.

On blackmail. Matthew Parris asks how NDAs ever managed to become part of our national life.

Subjects: Culture, News, Politics

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The Spectator was established in 1828, and is the oldest continuously published magazine in the English language. The Spectator’s taste for controversy, however, remains undiminished. There is no party line to which The Spectator’s writers are bound - originality of thought and elegance of expression are the sole editorial constraints.

The trial issue contains a “Thought Crime Special” with articles from Melanie Phillips, “I think, therefore I’m guilty”; Christopher Booker writes about “Scientists in hiding; the demonisation of academics who question the consensus”; Alan Rusbridger explores “How to stifle the press” and how England’s libel laws make it easy.

UK politics come under scrutiny from James Forsyth, Brendan O’Neill ponders if teenagers could ever be “Drunk and orderly”; while Tom Hollander writes his diary and James Delingpole says eat local organic food if you like, but don’t kid yourself that it’s ‘green’.

The Spectator’s regular arts coverage includes books, theatre, opera, cinema and exhibitions.

  • First Issue: 2 July 2005
  • Latest Issue: 10.11.2018
  • Issue Count: 677
  • Published: Weekly
  • ISSN: 2059-6499

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