The Spectator

Archived since 2 July 2005 Modern Archive

883 issues

The Spectator was established in 1828, and is the oldest continuously published magazine in the English language. The Spectator’s taste for controversy, however, remains undiminished. There is no party line to which The Spectator’s writers are bound - originality of thought and elegance of expression are the sole editorial constraints.

The trial issue contains a “Thought Crime Special” with articles from Melanie Phillips, “I think, therefore I’m guilty”; Christopher Booker writes about “Scientists in hiding; the demonisation of academics who question the consensus”; Alan Rusbridger explores “How to stifle the press” and how England’s libel laws make it easy.

 UK politics come under scrutiny from James Forsyth, Brendan O’Neill ponders if teenagers could ever be “Drunk and orderly”; while Tom Hollander writes his diary and James Delingpole says eat local organic food if you like, but don’t kid yourself that it’s ‘green’

The Spectator’s regular arts coverage includes books, theatre, opera, cinema and exhibitions.

Latest issue

  1. Windsor vs Windsor. Harry and Meghan’s Netflix documentary is out tomorrow – another round in the endless war of the Windsors, writes Freddy Gray. How will the British royals respond? ‘William wants to be seen to rise above it,’ an insider tells Freddy. ‘But if he feels he has to protect his wife from something that is factually untrue or particularly unfair, he will.’ William and Kate’s ‘strategy is to respond by being worthy and serious’, explains another source. Last month they visited Scarborough to discuss the cost-of-living crisis. ‘Expect them to be somewhere even worthier when Spare comes out,’ the source explains.
  2. Gyles Brandreth: how the King will handle Harry and Meghan’s ‘truth’. The Queen Consort tells Gyles that she is trying to get the King to watch some of Channel 4’s programme on canal boating, which Brandreth presents with Dame Sheila Hancock. ‘I think she only said that to indulge me,’ he writes in this week’s Diary. ‘Our new sovereign is a workaholic with a wide variety of private passions. TV is not one of them.’ The senior royals have landed on a strategy to deal with Harry and Meghan, Gyles reveals: they ‘have decided to do what the Queen Mother’s friend Noël Coward always did when faced with adversity or criticism. They are simply going to “rise above it”.’
  3. Rishi Sunak is about to feel winter’s sting. The rebellion over onshore wind farms has failed to metastasise into a full-blown Tory civil war, writes James Forsyth. However, the government is facing serious problems this winter. As Britain sends more energy to Europe than at any time in the past five years, there are questions over whether the UK will be able to meet its energy demands. Meanwhile, nearly 45,000 people are waiting more than 12 hours to be admitted to A&E and a strike by nurses will only compound the issue. ‘Of all the risks facing the government this winter, the biggest is that of an NHS crisis spiralling out of control.’
  4. The real lockdown diaries. Isabel Oakeshott reveals what she learnt co-writing Matt Hancock’s new book. ‘Since he still does not believe he did anything wrong, he was surprisingly inclined to disclosure. In an indication of how far he was prepared to go, the Cabinet Office requested almost 300 deletions and amendments to our original manuscript.’ When it comes to the vaccine, Oakeshott reveals a spat between Hancock and Kate Bingham. The vaccine tsar was ‘so alarmed by his haste that at one point she warned him that he might “kill people”.’
  5. Rachel Reeves: ‘Attack is the best form of defence’. Labour was planning to push a windfall tax on energy companies even before the Russian invasion of Ukraine, Reeves tells Katy Balls. ‘Like with all these things, often you think, “well the government are going to have to do it. But if we get there sooner, we’ll get some of the credit.”’ Reeves also reveals she sends out 3,200 Christmas cards each year. She has to start signing them in the summer.
  6. Inside team Truss’s tussle for titles. ‘In the final hours of the Liz Truss regime, a single question was obsessing advisers,’ writes James Heale. ‘Who would get a seat in the House of Lords? Her inner circle was divided as to whether, after just 49 days in office, such privileges were even appropriate. As a few aides tried to convince Truss that honours would be a mistake, her chief of staff, Mark Fullbrook, was adamant a select few would become the lords and ladies of tomorrow.’ A question remains over whether Truss will put forward a resignation honours list.

Subjects: Culture, News, News And Politics

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The Spectator was established in 1828, and is the oldest continuously published magazine in the English language. The Spectator’s taste for controversy, however, remains undiminished. There is no party line to which The Spectator’s writers are bound - originality of thought and elegance of expression are the sole editorial constraints.

The trial issue contains a “Thought Crime Special” with articles from Melanie Phillips, “I think, therefore I’m guilty”; Christopher Booker writes about “Scientists in hiding; the demonisation of academics who question the consensus”; Alan Rusbridger explores “How to stifle the press” and how England’s libel laws make it easy.

 UK politics come under scrutiny from James Forsyth, Brendan O’Neill ponders if teenagers could ever be “Drunk and orderly”; while Tom Hollander writes his diary and James Delingpole says eat local organic food if you like, but don’t kid yourself that it’s ‘green’

The Spectator’s regular arts coverage includes books, theatre, opera, cinema and exhibitions.

  • First Issue: 2 July 2005
  • Latest Issue: 10 December 2022
  • Issue Count: 883
  • Published: Weekly
  • ISSN: 2059-6499