The Spectator

Archived since 2 July 2005 Modern Archive

673 issues


The Spectator was established in 1828, and is the oldest continuously published magazine in the English language. The Spectator’s taste for controversy, however, remains undiminished. There is no party line to which The Spectator’s writers are bound - originality of thought and elegance of expression are the sole editorial constraints.

The trial issue contains a “Thought Crime Special” with articles from Melanie Phillips, “I think, therefore I’m guilty”; Christopher Booker writes about “Scientists in hiding; the demonisation of academics who question the consensus”; Alan Rusbridger explores “How to stifle the press” and how England’s libel laws make it easy.

UK politics come under scrutiny from James Forsyth, Brendan O’Neill ponders if teenagers could ever be “Drunk and orderly”; while Tom Hollander writes his diary and James Delingpole says eat local organic food if you like, but don’t kid yourself that it’s ‘green’.

The Spectator’s regular arts coverage includes books, theatre, opera, cinema and exhibitions.

Latest issue

The blood kingdom: Saudi Arabia’s mobster state. John R. Bradley worked with Jamal Khashoggi, and in our cover piece, says there’s far more to the story. Khashoggi had become aligned to the Muslim Brotherhood, and was perhaps the biggest single external threat to Mohammed bin Salman, the Crown Prince. MBS is feted in London and Washington as a reformer, but for how much longer can the West ignore his methods?

Sorry ladies, but I ain’t no little bird. Lionel Shriver writes about how recent events (especially the Kavanaugh affair) are portraying women as weak, defenceless creatures. She’d like to say that she, for one, cannot be described that way, despite her ‘own sexual abuse story’.

In defence of Pret. As a mother of two children with severe allergies, Fiona Unwin is amazed to hear Pret a Manger demonised as being entirely responsible for the death of customers with allergies. If you have a life-threatening allergy, she says, why eat out?

Hammond’s new strategy: uncertain times call for an uncertain Budget. The coming Budget will be a non-event, says James Forsyth. Philip Hammond has told Cabinet he’s sceptical about reports that people will happily pay more tax to fund the NHS and has asked Cabinet members not to request more money.

Doctor Woke: James Delingpole on the new Dr Who. Jodie Whittaker is very good and likeable, but the show’s scripts are full of virtue signalling.

Subjects: Culture, News, Politics

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The Spectator was established in 1828, and is the oldest continuously published magazine in the English language. The Spectator’s taste for controversy, however, remains undiminished. There is no party line to which The Spectator’s writers are bound - originality of thought and elegance of expression are the sole editorial constraints.

The trial issue contains a “Thought Crime Special” with articles from Melanie Phillips, “I think, therefore I’m guilty”; Christopher Booker writes about “Scientists in hiding; the demonisation of academics who question the consensus”; Alan Rusbridger explores “How to stifle the press” and how England’s libel laws make it easy.

UK politics come under scrutiny from James Forsyth, Brendan O’Neill ponders if teenagers could ever be “Drunk and orderly”; while Tom Hollander writes his diary and James Delingpole says eat local organic food if you like, but don’t kid yourself that it’s ‘green’.

The Spectator’s regular arts coverage includes books, theatre, opera, cinema and exhibitions.

  • First Issue: 2 July 2005
  • Latest Issue: 13.10.2018
  • Issue Count: 673
  • Published: Weekly
  • ISSN: 2059-6499

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