The Spectator

Archived since 2 July 2005 Modern Archive

866 issues

The Spectator was established in 1828, and is the oldest continuously published magazine in the English language. The Spectator’s taste for controversy, however, remains undiminished. There is no party line to which The Spectator’s writers are bound - originality of thought and elegance of expression are the sole editorial constraints.

The trial issue contains a “Thought Crime Special” with articles from Melanie Phillips, “I think, therefore I’m guilty”; Christopher Booker writes about “Scientists in hiding; the demonisation of academics who question the consensus”; Alan Rusbridger explores “How to stifle the press” and how England’s libel laws make it easy.

 UK politics come under scrutiny from James Forsyth, Brendan O’Neill ponders if teenagers could ever be “Drunk and orderly”; while Tom Hollander writes his diary and James Delingpole says eat local organic food if you like, but don’t kid yourself that it’s ‘green’

The Spectator’s regular arts coverage includes books, theatre, opera, cinema and exhibitions.

Latest issue

Is Giorgia Meloni the most dangerous woman in Europe? Italy’s snap general election will be held on 25 September and Meloni’s party is currently favourite in the polls. But is the Brothers of Italy a neo-fascist party? In a wide-ranging interview with Nicholas Farrell, the 45-year-old leader explains how her conservatism is inspired more by Roger Scruton and J.R.R. Tolkien than Mussolini.
 
Jonathan Sumption: a censor’s charter. The former justice of the Supreme Court makes the case against the Online Safety Bill, explaining how poorly drafted legislation could curtail freedom of speech. The central problem, Sumption explains, is that the bill invites ambiguity, encouraging tech firms to go further than parliament intends in order to avoid huge fines.
 
Unfit for purpose. The General Medical Council, which regulates doctors, increasingly looks like a vindictive, sclerotic and overly bureaucratic embarrassment, argues Max Pemberton, who was investigated for 11 months over an absurd, easily disprovable complaint against him.
 
Anthony Horowitz: my son and Rishi Sunak. In this week’s Diary, Horowitz admits he is ‘bewildered’ that Sunak isn’t streets ahead of Truss in the leadership race. He adds: ‘Well, I would say that, wouldn’t I? Although I’ve never met him, Mr Sunak employs my son, Cassian, as a special adviser. Cass has appeared a few times in the papers himself which delights me because he can’t shake off the “son of…” label. Some commentators even plug my books.’
 
Truss is preparing for government. Katy Balls has been on the campaign trail in Hertfordshire with Rishi Sunak where she finds strong support for him among members. Yet, for all his campaigning, Liz Truss is, as of this week, spending half her time planning for government. Katy takes a look at the runners and riders for a Truss cabinet. Her old friend Kwasi Kwarteng could be chancellor and James Cleverly is in the running to be foreign secretary. Michael Gove and Dominic Raab, though, are likely to find themselves in political Siberia.

Subjects: Culture, News, News And Politics

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The Spectator was established in 1828, and is the oldest continuously published magazine in the English language. The Spectator’s taste for controversy, however, remains undiminished. There is no party line to which The Spectator’s writers are bound - originality of thought and elegance of expression are the sole editorial constraints.

The trial issue contains a “Thought Crime Special” with articles from Melanie Phillips, “I think, therefore I’m guilty”; Christopher Booker writes about “Scientists in hiding; the demonisation of academics who question the consensus”; Alan Rusbridger explores “How to stifle the press” and how England’s libel laws make it easy.

 UK politics come under scrutiny from James Forsyth, Brendan O’Neill ponders if teenagers could ever be “Drunk and orderly”; while Tom Hollander writes his diary and James Delingpole says eat local organic food if you like, but don’t kid yourself that it’s ‘green’

The Spectator’s regular arts coverage includes books, theatre, opera, cinema and exhibitions.

  • First Issue: 2 July 2005
  • Latest Issue: 20 August 2022
  • Issue Count: 866
  • Published: Weekly
  • ISSN: 2059-6499